Playlist teacher guide - Respect

Playlist information

Playlist summary

This playlist explores the role that personal respect can play on the decisions we make and the way we behave.

Playlist purpose

The content of this playlist supports students to:

  • Understand the importance of self-respect
  • Explore the importance of respecting others
  • Propose a range of strategies for showing respect in personal and intimate relationships

Please note that some third party websites may not operate in all internet browers. If you're having difficulty accessing a site, try using alternative browsers (such as Chrome) in the first instance. If you're still unable to access the site, contact us.

Learning objectives

  • Know that respect is a fundamental human right for all people.
  • Understand the complexities of what it means to show respect and be respected.
  • Propose ways to show respect towards others to ensure safety, fairness and equity.

Key messages

  • Respect is a fundamental human right.
  • Showing respect does not necessarily mean you have to agree with another person.
  • Respect and being respectful are key components of relationships.

Year level(s) appropriate for

Year 10, Year 11, Year 12

Australian curriculum links

Investigate how empathy and ethical decision making contribute to respectful relationships.

Media items

Personal respect

Type: Video.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: We talk about respectful relationships, but what do we actually mean? This animation sets the scene for a deeper conversation.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Do you think you should respect someone even if you don’t like them? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Respect is a complex concept to define and one which is used in a number of different ways in society. Respect is about the way we treat other people. Our actions and attitudes should treat others in a positive manner that acknowledges them for who they are and/or what they are doing. To be respected means that you are being treated as an equal and your rights and feelings are being acknowledged and taken into account. To be respectful means that you are treating others in a dignified manner which takes into account their rights and feelings.

    To explore the concepts raised in the video further, discuss the following questions:

    • How do we treat all people with respect? even the people we don’t know or like?
    • How do we put our own feelings and desires aside in order to take into consideration the feelings and desires of others?

Respect and the Field Model

Type: Page.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Respect might be a complex concept, but the Field Model will help you apply it. Here’s how.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Is it possible to move the line in a situation without it being a sign of disrespect? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Respect should be a characteristic of all relationships regardless of whether it is a short- or long-term relationship and regardless of whether you share the same attitudes, values or beliefs. If you are acting on a shared decision within a personal relationship without taking into account what the other person wants, then that is a line move. By its very definition of disregarding the wants and needs of the other person – you are being disrespectful.

    To explore how The Field Model can be used to ensure shared decisions are made respectfully discuss a range of typical scenarios and decisions and use The Field Model to navigate the respectful way to make that decision or deal with that situation.

What is respect?

Type: Page.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: What is respect for authority? Respect for human rights? Empathy? Admiration? This page unpacks the details.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Do you agree with the saying that you have to earn someone’s respect? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    A more traditional view of respect is commonly seen as being given to someone based on hierarchy, position, qualifications or age. More contemporary views of respect propose a shift to a stronger focus on equality, empathy and connection across relationships regardless of age, race, faith, gender, sexual orientation or social standing.

    Respect is a concept young people need to understand and be able to use in order to be able to establish and maintain respectful interactions and relationships in all areas of their lives. It is about acknowledging the rights of others and treating everyone with fairness, tolerance, dignity and equity in all of their social interactions.

    To explore this further, discuss the following questions:

    • What are some of the common characteristics and qualities of people who you admire?
    • What people in authority do you need to comply with due to their position and role?
    • What sorts of things do you need to consider in order to ensure your interactions with others are always respectful?

Stop it at the start

Type: Video.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: Australian Government. ()

Summary: What happens if we don’t respect each other? This ‘Stop it at the Start’ ad illustrates how disrespect can lead to violence.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Can things we say be disrespectful? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    The argument in this video is that violence against women begins with disrespect. You can help students see an alignment here with our layered definition of respect, perhaps by working in reverse.

    • The opposite of admiring is demeaning (trivialising, belittling, criticising, and otherwise treating with contempt).
    • The opposite of empathy is dismissal.
    • The opposite of considering is disregarding.

    We see examples of all these in this video.

    Gender inequality is both a cause and consequence of disrespect in relationships. For this reason, it is important to drive cultural change to challenge gender inequality and social norms that support disrespect and violence against women and children. Respectful relationships are built on equality and mutual trust.

    To have further conversations about respect with your group, check out the Conversation Guide available from the Our Watch website for tips on how to start a conversation.

Respect in intimate relationships

Type: Page.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: It’s one thing to talk about respectful relationships generally, but what does respect look like in an intimate relationship?

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Is the respect you give in intimate relationships different to the respect given in other types of relationships? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Regardless of type of relationship, respect should be an underlying feature of all relationships. This includes respecting the following:

    • Opinions: acknowledging it is normal to have different interests or opinions to your partner or others.
    • Privacy: knowing it is not acceptable to talk about, share or post private matters or things shared in confidence.
    • Space and time: knowing it is OK to have both male and female friends and, particularly in intimate relationships, avoid restricting your partner’s freedom to maintain existing friendships.
    • Mood: a person’s mood can be determined by a range of factors such as family or external pressures, health, an argument; often the source of their mood will be unknown to us.
    • Mistakes: we all make mistakes and knowing it is OK to make them is an important life lesson; the capacity to apologise and move on is an important life skill.
    • Goals and hopes: support to achieve shared goals is more productive than actively seeking to undermine others’ hopes and aspirations.
    • Change or end of a relationship: as difficult as this can be, relationships do change, and they do end, it is important to be able to acknowledge this and have the skills to manage the process in a healthy and respectful way

    Young people need to be able to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy relationships, particularly when it comes to intimate relationships. Healthy intimate relationships can be rewarding and beside the initial ‘attraction’ you feel for the other person they must involve respect, trust and open communication. Intimate relationships consist of two people and each partner has the right to be treated equally.

    Love is respect.org suggests a respectful partner in an intimate relationship has the following qualities:

    • is caring, honest and treats you with respect
    • understands the importance of healthy relationships and works at it
    • never puts you down
    • doesn’t get angry if you spend time with family and friends
    • listens and can compromise
    • shares some of your interests
    • isn’t afraid to share thoughts and feelings
    • respects boundaries and doesn’t abuse technology
    • doesn’t require you to constantly ‘check-in’
    • doesn’t apply pressure to do something you don’t want to
    • doesn’t threaten you or make you feel scared.

    To explore the characteristics of respectful relationships further, direct students to visit the following website

Divorced Couple Shares Each Side Of Their…

Type: Video.

Duration: 10 minutes.

Source: Jubilee. ()

Summary: Most couples who are getting divorced will be upset and angry at each other for all sorts of reasons. Does that mean they can’t still respect each other? In this video, a divorced couple tell their stories with love and respect.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Can you still respect your ex after they have broken up with you? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Break ups hurt and whilst most people get over them and move on with their lives, for some people moving on can be very difficult and may manifest itself in anger, thoughts of revenge and disrespectful or abusive behaviour. The most important thing to remember when you are going through a break up is that you must still treat the other person with respect. No matter what they have done to you there is no justification for you to treat them with disrespect or worse still violence or abuse.

    To discuss the concept of maintaining respect after a break up, discuss the following question:

    • What strategies did this couple use to show respect to each other and to model the consideration of the other’s feelings?

    To explore strategies that a young person might use if their ex isn’t moving on and is being disrespectful, refer students to:

    • Or 1800 RESPECT for support and advice.

Respecting yourself

Type: Page.

Duration: 7 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: It’s much easier to respect others when you respect yourself. But what is self-respect really? Is liking yourself? Is it being proud? Or is it something else?

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Is it possible for others to respect you if you don’t respect yourself? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Self-respect is about recognising your own intrinsic worth, dignity and rights. With self-respect you can be kind to yourself, feel proud of who you are, your accomplishments and the values and beliefs you hold. Having a positive sense of self-respect is an important tool when establishing new relationships or maintaining respectful relationships. If you have a low level of self-respect you can be more vulnerable to coercion and manipulation in relationships.

    • What strategies do you use to demonstrate your own self-respect to others?
    • What signs might tell you that someone is questioning whether they deserve your respect?
    • How can you build up others so that they have respect for themselves and feel worthy of your respect?

Respect wrap-up

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Here’s a quick summary of the key messages and ideas in this playlist.

Activities and extras

The conversations generated through engaging with this playlist could be built upon and reinforced by exploring the following additional resources:

  • The Excuse interpreter - Recognising disrespect
  • You can use the Interpreter to become more aware of your reactions in these situations. It will help you avoid seemingly harmless phrases that might send mixed messages to young people about respect.
  • The Respect Checklist
    This checklist shows a range of views from girls and boys about respect. It will give you a picture of what your students might believe, and how they could react to disrespectful behaviour.
  • What is respect?
    This is a simple 2-minute vox pop about respect, but the definitions that people give and the nuances theyhighlight are very consistent with the framework outlined here.
  • Hi-Phi Nation: No Offense
    In this podcast, Sonny, a Sikh in Australia, gets racially abused. He’s furious; he feels like he’s been disrespected, and he wants justice. This is his story, plus a debate between two philosophers about two very different ways of looking at respect and free speech.
  • Russia laws ban ‘disrespect’ of government…
    This was a current news item at the time of this writing. We didn’t include it in the main playlist because it wasn’t clear how the situation would unfold, and the news coverage was thin, but we thought it was an interesting example of the politics around respect for authority. You might find it interesting to discuss with students.