Playlist teacher guide - Parties & festivals

Playlist information

Playlist summary

This playlist explores the issue of sexual assault and harassment at festivals and unpacks how the Field Model can be used to make the right decision. It also explores the role of bystanders in eliminating this kind of behaviour.

Playlist purpose

By engaging with this playlist, students will understand:

  • what constitutes a line move when at a party, festival or music gig
  • the important role that bystanders play in changing behaviour and social norms around festivals.

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Learning objectives

  • Propose ways to show respect towards others to ensure safety, fairness and equity.
  • Understand the role that peer influence, support and safety can play on our willingness to intervene in situations where disrespectful behaviours are occurring.
  • Propose practical and ethical ways to intervene in situations where disrespectful or violent behaviours are occurring.
  • Identify cues in real-life situations and practical and realistic ways to communicate when consent is and isn't being given.
  • Identify practical ways that a bystander can intervene if they are concerned about whether a situation is consensual or not.

Key messages

  • Respect and being respectful are key components of relationships.
  • Violence is never OK and never excusable, and perpetrators can take responsibility and seek support to deal with their behaviour.
  • If someone is too intoxicated or affected by other substances to drive, then they are unable to give or gain consent.
  • When dealing with situations or issues about consent it’s always important to double check that you are reading it right.
  • Bystanders can play a powerful role in challenging and preventing disrespectful behaviour.
  • If it’s safe to do so, bystanders can play a key role in helping victims of violence to feel and be safe.

Year level(s) appropriate for

Year 10, Year 11, Year 12

Australian curriculum links

Investigate how empathy and ethical decision making contribute to respectful relationships.

Propose, practise and evaluate responses in situations where external influences may impact on their ability to make healthy and safe choices.

Plan, rehearse and evaluate options (including CPR and first aid) for managing situations where their own or others’ health, safety and wellbeing may be at short or long-term risk.

Evaluate situations and propose appropriate emotional responses and then reflect on possible outcomes of different responses.

Media items

Parties & festivals

Type: Video.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Parties and festivals are great for hanging out with friends and listening to music. It’s important to remain respectful of others’ rights and aware of your responsibilities, particularly when everyone is excited, the atmosphere is emotionally charged, and some people are drinking or using illicit substances.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Can other people’s behaviour at parties and festivals spoil the event for you? Answers
    1. a.Sometimes, especially if people are drinking heaps
    2. b.No, I make sure I leave before things get too messy
    3. c.What other people do is their problem, not mine. I don’t let someone else spoil my night
    Discussion points:

    Parties and festivals often involve alcohol which can heighten people’s emotions and reduce inhibitions, sometimes resulting in impulsive behaviour. These impulsive decisions and behaviours can often impact on the enjoyment of others at the party or festival, especially when these behaviours involve disrespect targeted at other party or festival goers. 

    To unpack these concepts further, discuss the following questions:

    • What strategies can you use at parties if you are worried about how other people might behave?
    • How can you ensure that everyone is treated with respect and has a good time at the next party you go to?

Having a good time

Type: Page.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: When out having fun at a party or festival, it’s up to all of us to set the standards for what is acceptable behaviour. Acceptable behaviour means everyone has the opportunity to have a good time in a safe and respectful way.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. If someone is too intoxicated to know what they are doing, should you cut them some slack if they start groping or touching you in ways that are uncomfortable? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
  2. Question number 2. If one of your mates was trying to get physically intimate with a girl and you can tell she’s not in to them, would you step in? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    It is up to us all to set the standards about what is and isn’t OK behaviour at parties and festivals that we attend. This means making sure that we behave in a way that is respectful of other people at the party. But it also means calling out the bad behaviour of others, even your friends. This can get awkward and you need to be careful how you go about stepping in – but bad behaviour shouldn’t be something that we let happen. The behaviour you ignore once could become the behaviour that is accepted.

    To unpack these concepts further discuss the following with the group:

    • How do you manage your own heightened emotions and make sure that you behave respectfully at parties?
    • What strategies could you use to challenge bad behaviour at parties?
    • Does it make it harder to challenge someone’s bad behaviour if they are a friend of yours? Why? Why not?

Many different decisions

Type: Page.

Duration: 4 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Parties and festivals should be a good time for everybody. With so much happening so quickly, the Field Model can be used to guide decision making.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Can touching someone without asking ever be consensual? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Even though festivals are very public places with lots of interactions with lots of different people, the Field Model can still be used to guide our decision making. Everyone attending the festival is on an equal pegging and everyone has the right to make their own decisions. Any physical intimacy, even between strangers at a festival is still a shared decision, that both people need to agree to before anything is initiated. A grope without a YES is a line move.

    To unpack this further, discuss the following questions:

    • What are other examples of line moves that may happen at festivals?
    • How could you respond to each of these line moves if you were experiencing them?
    • How could you respond as a bystander if you witnessed these line moves?

YNIDK on the dance floor

Type: Page.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Crowded dance floors are a challenge for letting someone know that you are interested in them. The crowd and the noise and the music and the emotions – how can you indicate to someone that you are interested in them and would like to dance, in a way that is respectful? YNIDK can help navigate tricky situations.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Is the grab-and-dance from a stranger always a line move? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Letting someone know on a crowded dance floor that you’re into them and you want to dance can be a challenge – all the noise, the music, the crowds, the alcohol, the emotions … but it doesn’t give anyone an excuse for making a move without first getting permission. The Field Model can still be used to guide our decision making on the dance floor so we can be sure we don’t unintentionally make a line move.

    To unpack this further, discuss the following questions:

    • What are other examples of line moves on the dance floor?
    • How could you respond to each of these line moves if you were experiencing them?
    • How could you respond as a bystander if you witnessed these line moves?

Scenario: warehouse party

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: When a party is totally jammed, it can be difficult to get near someone that you’re interested in without being disrespectful and encroaching their personal space. How do you get their attention?

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Do you think this is a realistic scenario on a dance floor? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe, I’m not really sure
  2. Question number 2. Can you challenge someone’s bad behaviour without saying anything to them? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Christo decided to recruit Ian to help him step in, which was a great strategy – it meant there were strength in numbers, but it also meant that they could move in and allow Brooke to get away from the creepy bloke. Sometimes you don’t need to say anything you can just physically move between the two people and that is enough to send the signal that what was going on is not OK. Remember though that if you are going to use this technique, you’ve got to make sure the way you move into the space isn’t creepy and aggressive, otherwise you could be moving the line in trying to help.

Scenario: safe sleeping

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Going to a festival with a friend can be a wonderful experience, for both of you. But it’s important to set out ground rules and to stick to them.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Grace found somewhere to sleep so was Katie’s decision to take a guy back to her tent still a line move? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    In the Field Model, a line move is a line move, regardless of the outcome in the end. If you don’t check in with the other person involved in the decision, to check they are a Yes before you take action – it’s a line move.

Looking out for yourself and others

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: A practical list of tips to help you look out for yourself, friends, and people you don't yet know at parties and festivals. Help people resist peer pressure when they are in need and make sure everyone has a great time.

Parties & festivals - Wrap-up

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: A quick wrap-up of the Parties & festivals playlist.

Activities and extras

To build on the concept of bystander action and campaigns to raise awareness about harassment in public places, you could ask students to:

  • design their own strategies for making sure a party that they host is harassment free
  • investigate levels of harassment and sexual assault on public transport
  • design a public awareness campaign (similar to the #ittakesone campaign) that could be implemented to raise awareness about the issue on public transport.