Playlist teacher guide - Managing relationships

Playlist information

Playlist summary

This playlist explores the differences between respectful and disrespectful relationships and helps students to identify ways of managing their relationships to keep themselves and others happy and safe. Students will consider how the development and practise of effective communication, assertiveness, active listening and conflict resolution helps to maintain and nurture their relationships.

Playlist purpose

The content of the playlist supports students to:

  • use the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model
  • recognise characteristics of respectful and disrespectful relationships
  • develop the skills to manage their relationships.

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Learning objectives

  • Identify the characteristics of positive and negative peer relationships and how to manage them effectively.
  • Develop skills to manage peer pressure and influence.
  • Develop the skills and self-confidence to be comfortable with who they are and where they belong in the world.

Key messages

  • There are a range of internal and external influences on our choices that we need to recognise to make ethical choices.
  • It is important to challenge bullying behaviour as it is disrespectful and harmful.
  • If your peer group’s behaviours don’t align to your own there are ways to end or move on from those relationships.
  • We need to respect ourselves and others if we are going to be able to establish positive and quality relationships.

Year level(s) appropriate for

Year 5, Year 6

Australian curriculum links

Examine the influence of emotional responses on behaviour and relationships.

Practise skills to establish and manage relationships.

Identify how valuing diversity positively influences the wellbeing of the community.

Media items

Developing skills for positive relationships

Type: Page.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Friends are important and keeping them takes work. This page looks at the skills you need to keep positive relationships.

Teacher notes:

‘Tune in’ to what students already know about effective communication by having them use a Graffiti strategy.

Use graffiti sheets to identify which topics need further focus and those that aren’t necessary for your students. For those topics needing further development use the media items applicable to that topic.

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): skills that contribute to positive relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how can I maintain and nurture positive relationships?

 

Graffiti

Split students into 5 groups. Each group is given a large piece of paper (graffiti sheet) with a different topic: effective communication, assertiveness, empathy, active listening and conflict resolution. Give each group 10-15 minutes to discuss their topic and add words, phrases or drawings to demonstrate what they know about their topic. The graffiti sheets are passed to another group and each group reads their new graffiti sheet, ticking anything they agree with, writing comments next to ideas and writing any new responses on the sheet. Repeat this process until graffiti sheets are returned to the original group to read, discuss and summarise.

Display graffiti sheets around the classroom for students to continue to read and add to as they move through more activities.

Effective communication

Type: Page.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: When problems happen, communicating your feelings is a great start to solving it. This page has some tips to express your feelings effectively.

Teacher notes:

Cooperative activities could be anything that requires a group to work together to achieve something and may include:

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): skills that contribute to positive relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how can I maintain and nurture positive relationships?

 

Communication

In groups students complete a cooperative activity where all members need to work together to complete a task. However, each group member is assigned a particular character to play without the other members knowing what it is. Character roles could include: always happy student, often overly excited; angry student who has had a big argument at home and does not want to be at school; student that wants to be in charge and be heard over everyone else; inclusive student who wants everyone to be heard and included; the whatever student who will go along with the groups decision and doesn’t really express their thoughts or ideas. After the activity the class discusses how the task went, what helped them achieve it, what impacted on their success and how emotional responses affected communication, behaviour and the relationships between group members. Discuss how the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model could help each member in the group activity.

 

Explain to students that in further activities they will be looking at factors that can help improve our communication with others.

Assertiveness

Type: Page.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Assertiveness is the ability to speak up for ourselves in a way that is honest and respectful. This page looks at what assertiveness is, how it’s different from being aggressive, and how it can help us do what we have to do.

Teacher notes:

Aggressive, Passive or Assertive?

Situations may include incidents that have occurred in the classroom, school, community or from the following:

  • a student keeps pushing you in the canteen line, you can push them back or hit them, go to the back of the line away from them, ask them to stop pushing you;
  • a student isn’t following the rules of the game, you can start a fight with them, stop playing the game, or explain the rules and ask them to follow the rules so everyone can enjoy the game;
  • your friend keeps taking your stuff without asking, you can tell them that you’d like them to ask before taking anything of yours, take something of theirs they really love without telling them, let them keep doing it because that’s what friends do.

 

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): skills that contribute to positive relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how can I maintain and nurture positive relationships?

Assertiveness

Explain to students that there are three ways of communicating with people when they are doing something we don’t like. These are passive, assertive and aggressive. Discuss each one and have students suggest which they think would be the most respectful way of communication.

Explain that being assertive shows we respect ourselves and others.

Aggressive, Passive or Assertive?

Provides students with examples of situations where people have reacted. Students are to choose the assertive approach from multiple choice options.

 

Additional activities:

Students could create their own role plays showing a situation with a different version for each type of response: aggressive, assertive and passive.

Active listening

Type: Video.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: TEDx Talks. ()

Summary: Do you ever switch off or check your phone while a friend is talking? In this video, Katie Owens talks about active listening and ways to make sure that you ‘be here, now’.

Teacher notes:

Active listening

Active listening is a communication skill that can help us understanding others and build positive relationships. Listening is not something that just happens, it is a conscious decision to listen to and understand the message of the speaker.

To be an active listener you should:

  • Stop thinking about what you’re going to say next and just listen.
  • Let the other person finish what they’re saying without interrupting.
  • Give positive non-verbal feedback such as nodding, smiling or mirroring the facial expressions of the speaker.
  • Make eye contact that the speaker is comfortable with.
  • Stay focussed: refrain from fidgeting, checking your phone, playing with objects or looking around.

 

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): skills that contribute to positive relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how can I maintain and nurture positive relationships?

Brainstorm behaviours of active listening.

 

Additional activities:

Provide activities in pairs and groups where one person talks about their favourite things, something they have done or something that is important to them. The ‘active listeners’ have to share what the speaker said. This can be shared as a whole class discussion or recorded on a worksheet.

Conflict resolution

Type: Page.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: We can’t always get our own way but, when faced with a conflict with other people, we can try our best to resolve it. This page has some tips to help with that.

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): skills that contribute to positive relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how can I maintain and nurture positive relationships?

Conflict Resolution

Discuss conflict and how this is a normal part of life. The way we handle conflict is what is important.

Have students create their own posters to remind them of how to deal with conflict.

What to do if you want to leave a friendship?

Type: Page.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Positive friendships are important, but not all of your relationships turn out for the best. This page looks at toxic friends, how to pick an unhealthy relationship, and what you can do about it.

Teacher notes:

Example scenarios displaying toxic behaviour:

  • You comfort your friend whenever they are upset and you sit with them until they feel better. One day you are really sad about something that happened at home. You want to talk to your friend about it but they tell you they just want to play and they leave you on your own.
  • You’ve been friends for years but lately every time you hang out together you end up feeling worse.
  • You have a friend you hang out with at school but they keep hanging around someone else who you aren’t really friends with. Whenever this person is away your friend spends the day with you but as soon as they are back your friend ditches you.

 

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): characteristics of positive and negative relationships.

Possible inquiry question: how do I identify behaviours that make a friendship safe or unsafe?

Present students with scenes/scenarios with friends interacting. Students indicate whether they think the behaviour is toxic. Discuss why the behaviour is toxic/not toxic and what they would do in that situation.

 

Additional activities:

Have students roleplay ending a friendship.

Using Feel, Think, Act, Reflect - Years 5-6

Type: Slides.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Revisit the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model, and think of some ways it could be used to work through problems you’ve noticed. What would you do?

Teacher notes:

Set up scenarios/role plays within the classroom in situations where students may experience conflict. Students practise using the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model and ways of managing their relationships in these situations. Scenarios could focus on topics such as bystander/upstander behaviour; gender discrimination; local class/school issue; friendship groups and changes or the following examples:

  • You witness an older student upsetting a younger student you know. This could be your younger brother/sister/neighbour/cousin/buddy/someone you don’t know. How do you handle the situation?
  • There is someone in your year that you really don’t like. Every day you tell yourself you will just ignore what they say but they make you so angry that you can’t help but call them names and be mean back to them. Lately it’s started getting worse and you have both been pushing each other. What can you do to stop this continuing?
  • A few people in your year are always posting pictures on social media. You don’t have a phone or access to social media but one of your friends took a photo of you and said they were going to post it for everyone else to see. You don’t want them to. What do you do?
  • You and your friend want to join a local sporting team but the majority of the people playing are of the opposite gender to you. They let you play but don’t really include you when the game is on.

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect Model.

Possible inquiry question: how does respectful conflict resolution help my relationships?

 

Discuss how the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model can be used to help respond to conflict. Remind students how to use this model when trying to solve problems.

 

Students should reflect on their personal qualities, strengths, values and beliefs and what is true to them when responding to a situation rather than making decisions based on someone else’s opinions and expectations.

 

When problem solving, students should be reminded to use some of the skills for respectful relationships such as communication, assertiveness, empathy and active listening.

 

Through the decision-making process students should also consider people in their support network or support services they can access to assist them.

 

In groups or individually students address different scenarios using the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model.