Playlist teacher guide - Identity – Who am I?

Playlist information

Playlist summary

This playlist allows students to explore who they are by looking at the factors that shape their identity, investigating some of the influences on their beliefs and values and considering how society and important relationships may influence their decision making, behaviours, thoughts and actions. Understanding these factors provides a foundation for developing a stronger sense of self and self respect, asking relevant questions, seeking help and support, building resilience and managing stress.

Playlist purpose

The content of the playlist supports students to:

  • understand identity, what shapes it and what it looks like
  • challenge gender stereotypes.

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Learning objectives

  • Understand what identity means, what shapes it and what their own identity looks like.
  • Explore the importance of challenging discriminatory behaviour and develop the skills to be an active bystander.
  • Develop the skills and self-confidence to be comfortable with who they are and where they belong in the world.

Key messages

  • Personal identities change over time and are influenced by family, friends, culture, media, changes in our circumstances, and the choices we make as individuals to change ourselves.
  • Checking in on our values and beliefs can help us make ethical choices when it comes to our relationships.
  • There are a range of internal and external influences on our choices that we need to recognise to make ethical choices.

Year level(s) appropriate for

Year 5, Year 6

Australian curriculum links

Recognise how media and important people in the community influence personal attitudes, beliefs, decisions and behaviours.

Examine how identities are influenced by people and places.

Identify how valuing diversity positively influences the wellbeing of the community.

Media items

Self-confidence

Type: Page.

Duration: 1 minute.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: What is self-confidence? This page looks at self-confidence and how it helps form our identity.

Teacher notes:

Students can add to their Identity Poster when completing the following page media and media items:

  • Personality Traits and Strengths
  • What do I believe?
  • Boys and Girls on Stereotypes
  • Discuss Male Gender Stereotypes
  • What do I Value?

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): what shapes our identity and what our own identity looks like.

Possible inquiry question: how does my identity change as I get older?

Brainstorm the meanings of personal qualities, strengths, beliefs and values.

Explain to students that they will be completing various activities around personal qualities, strengths, beliefs and values to help them begin to build up an awareness of their own identity and who they are.

Identity Poster

Have students draw portraits of themselves and add a title such as Who Am I? This is me, My Identity, or simply their name. Explain to students that they will be adding words and phrases that describe their qualities, strengths, beliefs and values as they build up their idea of who they are. Allow time for students to add words and phrases that they feel describes their identity.

Personality traits and strengths

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: This page looks at how identifying our traits and strengths helps to establish an image of who we are.

Teacher notes:

Personality Traits

Students can use a list to determine their own personal qualities. Many personality traits lists can be found online.

Strengths

Students can complete the strengths spotting activity or use the Types of Strengths information in the page media for ideas on their strengths. View this online fact sheet of characters strengths to help stimulate ideas.

 

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): what shapes our identity and what our own identity looks like.

Possible inquiry question: how does my identity change as I get older?

Personal qualities

Students could use a personality traits list to determine their own personal qualities. Add qualities to Identity Poster.

Identify any characteristics considered male/female and suggest ways to challenge these stereotypes.

Strengths

Strength spotting: students look for strengths in themselves and others. The e-book Working with Strengths in Schools suggests ideas for strengths spotting as follows:

  • Energy. What activities give you an energetic buzz?
  • Authenticity. When do you feel most like the “real you”?
  • Ease. What activities come naturally to you? What do you excel at, sometimes without even trying?
  • Attention. Where do you focus? These activities may play to your strengths.
  • Rapid learning. What have you picked up quickly, almost effortlessly?
  • Motivation. What activities do you do simply for the love of doing them?
  • Voice. A shift in passion, energy and engagement probably means you’re talking about a strength.
  • Words and phrases. When you’re saying “I love to…” or “It’s just great when...,” a strength is likely involved.
  • ‘To do’ lists. Things that never make it to your task list are often those you never need to be asked twice to do.

Add strengths to Identity Poster.

Stimulate discussions around strengths associated with girls/boys or men/women. Are there traits associated with being masculine/feminine? Are these accurate? Where do these stereotypes come from? Is this acceptable? What impact does it have? How do you challenge these stereotypes?

 

Additional activities:

Strengths

  • Strengths Cards in groups, using a set of Strengths Cards. In this game, the aim for each individual is to gather a handful of cards that most closely resembles their strengths by trading cards with other players. Start by dealing seven cards to each player and leaving the remaining face down on the table. The player to the left of the dealer starts by choosing a card in their hand they do not want and would like to trade. Other players offer cards to swap or swap a card in the pile on the table. Each player takes it in turn and after 10 minutes, all players lay out their cards and describe their strengths to the group.
  • At their best stories: have students write stories describing others they have witnessed ‘being at their best’. Stories should be about other students in the class/year so they receive feedback on their strengths. This could be an anonymous letter placed in a feedback box where students are given the freedom to add to it randomly or a specific activity where everyone must write something.
  • Students each have a strengths tree and other students write the strengths on the roots that they see in that person. The student’s personal qualities could be added to the branches and their support network members to the leaves. Tree example.

What do I believe?

Type: Page.

Duration: 2 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: What are my beliefs? This page looks how your beliefs have a say in your behaviour and are an important part of your identity.

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): what shapes our identity and what our own identity looks like.

Possible inquiry question: how does my identity change as I get older?

Beliefs

Students add any beliefs they have about themselves or the world, that they would like to share, to their identity poster.

Discuss how beliefs may contribute to conflicts with others. Religious conflict, cultural differences, debates on same sex marriage etc.

What do I value?

Type: Page.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: This page looks at personal values. What they are, what influences them, and how we use them to make choices.

Teacher notes:

Students could also select values that they feel are most important to them from an online list of values. There are numerous sites with lists such as this example.

Suggested activities:

WALA (we are learning about): what shapes our identity and what our own identity looks like.

Possible inquiry question: how does my identity change as I get older?

Ask students what they think influences the values they have?

How do important people in their lives influence how they act or behave? Is this related to values?

Students review a list of personal values and think deeply about which ones are important to them. Students could simply add these to their Identity Poster or develop a description of their most important values to add.

Additional activities:

Students could consider the values of characters in the stories they are reading. How do they know what they value? What are they doing, saying or thinking that identifies their values?

Investigate local or global issues and consider the values behind the decisions that were made. Think about an advocate for women’s rights and what their values might be. Think about those protesting women’s rights and what their values might be.

Activities and extras

After viewing the playlist, if you’d like to explore more on gender stereotypes and how to challenge them, you can share the following PROJECT ROCKIT video with your class: GENDER: What can I do to challenge gender stereotypes?

 

Ask students: Does society’s gender expectations influence our identity?

Gender is an important part of identity. We often associate ourselves with particular gender roles from an early age. This is influenced by messages we receive from parents, family, friends, books, toys, advertising and the media.

How we behave, what we wear, the interests we have, and how we relate to one another are all influenced by our society’s ideas and norms about gender. We are inundated with messages from families, peers, communities and popular culture, whether explicitly or subtly, about the roles men and women should play in relationships, communities, the workplace, and even how and when they should express emotion. To be true to our own identities we need to challenge gender stereotypes.