Playlist teacher guide - Field Model scenarios

Playlist information

Playlist summary

Dramatic scenarios that show authentic—and tricky—situations in relationships, including negotiating sexual consent, shared relationship decisions and breaking up. The scenarios demonstrate complex, layered situations designed to stimulate discussion and reflection. Commentary pages show how the Field Model can be used to analyse the scenes and get insight into what is healthy behaviour in a relationship and what is disrespectful, possibly abusive behaviour.

Playlist purpose

The content of the playlist supports students to:

  • analyse how the steps in the Field Model can be practically applied to realistic relationship scenarios
  • discuss a range of practical strategies they can use for establishing and maintaining respectful relationships
  • differentiate between behaviours that are respectful and behaviours that are disrespectful.

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Learning objectives

  • Propose ways to show respect towards others to ensure safety, fairness and equity.
  • Be able to differentiate between respectful and disrespectful relationships.
  • Identify a range of respectful behaviours that can occur in relationships (including communication, trust and equality).
  • Propose strategies for establishing and maintaining respectful relationships.
  • Understand that consent is a complex area and it is each individual’s responsibility within the situation to ensure they are being clear about whether they are giving and receiving consent from the others involved.

Key messages

  • Showing respect does not necessarily mean you have to agree with another person.
  • Relationships aren’t always easy and sometimes go through hard times but respect is still important, even in difficult times.
  • Respect is still required, even if a relationship has ended.
  • When dealing with situations or issues about consent it’s always important to double check that you are reading it right.

Year level(s) appropriate for

Year 10, Year 11, Year 12

Australian curriculum links

Evaluate situations and propose appropriate emotional responses and then reflect on possible outcomes of different responses.

Propose, practise and evaluate responses in situations where external influences may impact on their ability to make healthy and safe choices.

Plan, rehearse and evaluate options (including CPR and first aid) for managing situations where their own or others’ health, safety and wellbeing may be at short or long-term risk.

Media items

Money commentary

Type: Page.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: What can we learn when we apply the Field Model to the Money scene? We might find a rule break or a line move, but could this also just be a bad relationship?

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Should Ruben have handled the argument differently? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.I don’t know
    Discussion points:

    Having read the notes, do students think Ruben should have acted differently? If so, how? (And what could he have done to prevent getting into this situation in the first place?) For instance, should he have sold the laptop at a loss, saved up the remainder and gone on the holiday? If they think he handled it correctly, how would they justify that? If being correct meant the relationship breaking-up, are they okay with that?

  2. Question number 2. Should Rachel have handled the argument differently? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.I don’t know
    Discussion points:

    Do students think Rachel should have acted differently? If so, how? Should she have respected Ruben’s desire for a laptop? Should she have accommodated his strategy for getting a credit card? Or is she right that they had an agreement, he broke it, and the fact that he is unwilling to acknowledge that or try to make it up to her is a sign that they shouldn’t be together.

  3. Question number 3. Can you think of strategies you could use in a relationship to avoid being blindsided, or blindsiding someone else? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    Discussion points:

    If you can’t think of any strategies, why not? Is it hard to imagine the situation? Or you can’t think of a way to stop it? Why do people blindside each other at all? What’s really the problem? And what would be solutions? For instance, checking in, listening to what the other person is saying, and responding to that—even if it means you can’t get everything you want.

Break up commentary

Type: Page.

Duration: 6 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: What can we learn by applying the Field Model to the Break Up scene? Where were the line moves and what were the alternatives?

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Are there ways in which Euan could have managed this situation more effectively? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Obviously Euan is shocked and upset, and especially hurt that it seems like Abby has been seeing someone else, but still: could he have done things better? Even in the “right path” that he takes, could it have been handled differently? Could he have seen where he was pushing too far? Could he have postponed the conversation? But does handling this situation better mean he has no say at all? Does he just have to accept exactly what Abby says and say goodbye? Is there a middle ground?

  2. Question number 2. Are there ways in which Abby could have managed this situation more effectively? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Maybe
    Discussion points:

    Similar to the previous question, could Abby have done anything differently here? Probably she followed the Field Model process just fine, but could she have finessed some of the details better? Euan is obliged to manage his emotions, but could Abby have made that easier? Is it better to hold back on upsetting details, or does leaving details to the imagination make things worse?