Playlist teacher guide - Emotions & actions

Playlist information

Playlist summary

This playlist explores how students can constructively communicate and express emotions, identify the needs, wants and feelings of others, and help others feel a sense of belonging. It also examines how emotional responses may change in different situations and are sometimes influenced by the expectations of others, including the effect of gender stereotypes and social norms about showing emotions.

Playlist purpose

The content of the playlist supports students to:

  • recognise and identify their own feelings
  • explore positive ways to make friends
  • recognise the emotions of others
  • practise positive ways of reacting in different situations
  • share, take turns and cooperate with their peers
  • challenge gender stereotypes and expectations.

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Learning objectives

  • Develop personal, social and emotional skills and behaviours to include others and help them feel they belong.
  • Develop the skills to express their emotions appropriately.
  • Identify different emotional responses for different situations
  • Describe how emotional responses can affect others.

Key messages

  • Being kind, helpful and respectful to others helps to make friends.
  • Expressing needs, wants and feelings calmly and respectfully helps others to understand me.
  • Understanding and controlling our emotions helps to communicate our needs and wants effectively.

Year level(s) appropriate for

F, Year 1, Year 2

Australian curriculum links

Identify and practise emotional responses that account for own and others’ feelings.

Identify actions that promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Identify and describe emotional responses people may experience in different situations.

Explore actions that help make the classroom a healthy, safe and active place.

Media items

Emotions and actions introduction

Type: Slides.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: The Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model helps us to make choices and act in ways that are respectful to ourselves and others. Can you remember what to do for each step?

Teacher notes:

Ensure visuals of the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model are displayed in the classroom and other areas of the school.

 

Suggested activities:

Slide 1: Feel, Think, Act, Reflect Model

Remember we have been learning about the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model to help us make choices and use behaviours that are respectful to ourselves and others. Can you remember what we do for each step?

Slide 2: Story stills

Over several lessons we are going to learn how to use the model and develop some skills to help us make more respectful choices. We will also use our knowledge and skills to help Nova or Dax make more respectful choices along the way.

Look at the model again and review what each step involves. Have students suggest questions they could ask themselves for each step.

  • Feel: What am I feeling? How do I know?
  • Think: What do I think I want? How might others feel and why? What do I think others want? What choices do I have to get what I want respectfully?
  • Act: Make a choice and act on it.
  • Reflect: How do I think everyone is feeling and what might they be thinking about my actions?

 

Additional activities:

Get moving – revisit actions for model. Students stand up for activity. Place hands on their heart for feel, hands on head for think, jump up with arms up to dive for act, and a full star jump for reflect.

Nova and Dax’s First Day

Type: Slides.

Duration: 10 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Nova and Dax are new to the school and want to make friends, but things don’t quite go to plan. How can they use the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model to help them?

Teacher notes:

Lesson 1

Examples of respectful/disrespectful behaviour:

  • Nova hugs friends. What if the friend didn’t want a hug? What if Nova hugged too hard?
  • Nova hands people bugs. What if the person loved bugs? What if the person was scared of bugs?
  • Nova punched people. What if Nova thought people like punches? What if Nova was a boy?
  • Dax took over games. What if the other students didn’t know how to play the game? What if the students were all younger than Dax?
  • No one would play with Dax. What if everyone tried to include Dax but he still kept taking over?

Lesson 2

When students apply the Feel section of the model, they are thinking about how they are feeling. What is my body feeling? Where am I feeling it and what is the emotion associated with that feeling?

When students re-apply the Feel section after they have acted on a decision, they are thinking about how they feel about the outcome of the decision. What am I feeling? How do I know? This cycle creates a reflective process.

Background information:

  • Before we can learn how to control feelings, we first have to notice them. You can help children notice feelings by noticing them yourself and giving them labels: happy, sad, excited, frustrated, angry, embarrassed, surprised, etc. Giving feelings names helps to make them more manageable for children.
  • Learning to pay attention to how they are feeling helps children understand that they can have emotions without being controlled by them.
  • Talking with children about what it’s like when you’re angry, sad, nervous or excited helps them find ways to express feelings without having to act them out through negative behaviours. Children learn these skills best when they hear adults and peers using words to express feelings and when they are encouraged to use words like this too.
  • Learning to name feelings helps children find ways to express them without having to act them out.
  • Help children to separate a feeling from a difficult reaction by helping them name it. Being able to say or think, “I am feeling angry,” means that children don’t have to act really angry before anyone takes notice. It allows them to choose how they will respond. The same idea works with other difficult feelings like nervousness or fear.

Lesson 3

When students apply the Think section of the model, they are thinking about what they want, how others might be feeling and what others might be wanting. What do I want? How will others feel about that? What might other people want?

When students re-apply the Think section, they are assessing how other people felt about the decision they made. How did it affect other people? What were they feeling and how do I know? Students will also reassess their own needs and if so, continue with the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model.

 

Suggested activities:

Note: Suggestions are made with the intent that teachers will choose the content and activities that best fits their students’ needs.

Lesson 1

WALA (we are learning about): recognising feelings of ourselves.

Inquiry question: How do I show my feelings?

Read through story Nova and Dax’s First Day with students (whole class, groups or individually depending on student needs/resources). Take the opportunity to discuss, make predictions, ask questions etc.

Check for comprehension. Activities could include: retelling, story map, true or false statements, guided questions, question ball where students ask a who, what, when, where, why or how question for others to answer.

Provide students with examples from the story that were respectful/disrespectful. Ask students to demonstrate their opinion with thumbs up/down/side; movement to different sides of the room, stand up/sit down or another activity to indicate their position on the event. Positions could include strongly agree, agree, unsure, disagree, strongly disagree. Ask students to justify their position and discuss the types of feelings they think are being felt by different characters. Ask students the what if? questions and allow them to change their opinion and discuss views.

Revisit the Feel step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model.
In order to react and act respectfully to a situation it is important to understand your emotions and how you are feeling. Taking time to understand how you feel about a particular situation can help you make good decisions and act in a way that is respectful of yourself and others around you.

Media item activity: Inside Out - Guessing the feelings.

Lesson 2

WALA (we are learning about): ways to include others and help them feel they belong.

Inquiry question: how can we be inclusive of our peers?

Discuss story: Nova and Dax’s First Day from previous lesson and what students remember.

Ask students to recall the Feel step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model and what we do at that step.

Re-read screens 1-3 of story: Nova and Dax’s First Day

Identify how Nova or Dax were feeling and complete a Feelings Portrait of your chosen character:

  • Draw and colour a portrait of the character’s head and neck. Cut out portrait and staple the top to another piece of paper. Trace around the outline of the head on the second piece of paper. On the second piece of paper students will write or draw what they think the character is thinking and feeling. Students can share portraits and discuss what they think is going on inside the characters head.

Discuss how Nova or Dax tried to make friends. How do you think the other students around Nova or Dax were feeling?

Brainstorm ways to make new friends and discuss the Friendship Recipe:

  • Greetings: smiling and saying hello to others lets them know you are ready for friendship.
  • Similarities: you and your friend need to have something in common that you can share and talk about.
  • Kindness: Kindness is a good way to start a friendship. Small kindness shows you are a caring person.
  • Compliments: when you say something nice about someone, they feel good and then you feel good. When you feel good around people you want to be around them more.
  • Fun: having a good time together, doing what both people enjoy, helps us to stay friends. For both people to have fun we need to share, take turns, help and cooperate.

Lesson 3

WALA (we are learning about): recognising other peoples’ emotions.

Possible inquiry question: How might I know how someone is feeling?

Revisit the Think step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model

  • Before taking any action or saying anything in a situation it is important to think about yourself but also about others. When thinking about others you need to explore how they might be feeling and why they may have acted in a particular way. This information helps you decide how you could act respectfully.

Discuss question “How do we know how someone is feeling?” By their facial expressions, body language, what they are saying and how they are saying it.

Read screens 1-4 of Scenario: Nova and Dax’s First Day and, using emotions vocabulary from previous lessons and visuals of the story, ask students to identify how the students around Nova and Dax might be feeling and how they know. When Nova and Dax realised how the other students were feeling how did it change the way they acted?

Media Item activity: Partly Cloudy.

 

Additional activities:

Identify the four Stages of the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model. Strategies could include:

  • Highlight each step in a different colour.
  • Read a section and ask students to identify which step of the model is occurring.
  • Divide class into groups and each group finds a step of the model within the scenario then presents their findings to the class.

Identify how characters reacted and how that reaction affected others around them, and the emotions associated with each action.

Discuss how students might react if they were a character in the story and Nova or Dax was playing with them.

Friendship Soup: take the ingredients of the friendship recipe and add just the right amount of each to make friendship soup.

Nova and the Book

Type: Slides.

Duration: 5 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Nova takes action to keep a class book to herself but, on reflection, she feels she could have made better choices. How can she use the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model so that everyone gets what they want?

Teacher notes:

Lesson 1

Sharing is a skill that requires children to see things from the viewpoints of others. It teaches them about compromise and fairness. They learn that if we give a little to others, we can get some of what we want as well. Sharing can be a challenge, especially at first, as children learn how to take turns and negotiate, and how to cope with disappointment. Most children need practice and support to develop this skill.

Lesson 2

Teaching social skills that demonstrate respect in relationships should be embedded with daily activities. However, there are certain strategies teachers can use to explicitly teach friendship skills: teaching the concept, modelling appropriate behaviour, providing practice opportunities with feedback, and supporting children’s use of the behaviour in context.

Taking turns

Taking turns is an important social skill for children to develop. Communication, patience and cooperation will help to children in taking turns. Some children find it difficult to let others take turns in games and activities, or with toys and materials and even when it comes to being heard. They want to get in first every time and may become angry and frustrated when they cannot get what they want.

Board games or other simple games support children in taking turns and waiting for others. Activities where each child has to take a turn to complete the task also allows for practice.

Helping others

Being helpful is one of the behaviours that is important in developing positive relationships. Being helpful makes it easier for children to play and respond to others. Recognising when a friend needs help is a skill that requires empathy.

Demonstrations, stories and role plays where a character or person is upset or needs help can assist children in recognising when and how to help others. Role plays allow children to practise helping others and recognise how to respond in appropriate, helpful ways.

Cooperation helps children to build relationships by working together to achieve something. Cooperation is an act of working together for a common purpose where everyone benefits. For cooperation to work, everyone has to be an active member of the team and do what they agree to do.

People who are working as a team and cooperating with each other:

  • listen to each other without interrupting
  • encourage everyone to join in
  • are willing to hear and accept the ideas of others
  • are willing to change roles in the group, eg. may be a leader sometimes and a follower at other times
  • recognise the skills and strengths of others
  • don't compete with each other
  • discuss problems calmly
  • take responsibility for their part of the task
  • are willing to work towards the success of the group rather than their own individual success
  • have good communication skills

The Four Friends is a Bhutanese story that shows how cooperation works.

Cooperative games can also be useful in teaching children to play with each other rather than against each other.

 

Suggested activities:

Lesson 1

WALA (we are learning about): ways to include others and help them feel they belong.

Possible inquiry question: How does sharing and taking turns help people feel like they belong?

Read through story Nova and the Book with students (whole class, groups or individually depending on student needs/resources). Present students with the following questions:

  • What do you think Nova wanted? How do you think she was feeling? Why?
  • What choice did Nova make to get what she wanted?
  • Which step of the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model is Nova at in screen 2? (Act).
  • Is it okay to start at the Act step? Why? Yes, it is okay. Sometimes we act before we think but if we then work through the model cycle, we can make better decisions and be more respectful of ourselves and others. It is always better to Feel and Think before we Act but when we Reflect we get the chance learn from our mistakes
  • Revisit the Act step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model.
  • When students apply the act section of the model, they are making a choice as to how to behave and then testing the decision. What am I going to do? Let’s do it.

When students re-apply the Act section, they are making a choice based on previous consequences of their behaviour. Will I do the same thing again? Will I do things differently if this happens again? Do I need to do anything at all? If so, what will I do? Let’s do it.

Once you have worked out how you feel about the situation and you have thought about the feelings and motivations of the other people involved in the situation, then you are ready to act yourself. It is important to ensure that when you respond that you behave respectfully, and you don’t escalate the situation with your behaviour.

Ask students:

  • After Nova hid the book what was she feeling and thinking?
  • How did Nova solve the book problem?
  • Are there other ways this problem could have been solved respectfully?

Brainstorm a list of ways students can demonstrate sharing or take turns with others in their class. Have students create a bookmark showing an act of sharing or taking turns either with Nova and her classmates or within their own classroom. Extension: students add a sentence about sharing.

Media Item: The Rainbow Fish

Lesson 2:

WALA (we are learning about): ways to include others and help them feel they belong.

Possible inquiry question: how does cooperation help others feel like they belong?

Ask students to recall what happened in the story Nova and the New Book. Re-read if necessary.

Discuss:

  • How did the students feel at the beginning of the story and what were they doing to get the new book?
  • How did the students feel at the end of the story and how were they getting to read the new book?
  • How does sharing something make you feel?
  • What is cooperation? How does it help your friendships?

Teaching and learning activity based on cooperative games such as Caterpillar Riot

 

Additional activities:

Brainstorm other ways students can help others feel good/happy/included in the classroom and school. Group ideas under headings such as sharing; taking turns; helping others; and cooperating.

The Rainbow Fish

Type: Video.

Duration: 6 minutes.

Source: Storyline Online. ()

Summary: Sometimes, it’s really hard to share. Find out how the Rainbow Fish learns about the value of sharing and friendship.

Survey questions:

  1. Question number 1. Did the Rainbow Fish make the right decision to share? Answers
    1. a.Yes
    2. b.No
    3. c.Unsure
    Discussion points:

    Ask students to explain their answers.

    The Rainbow Fish realised that sharing with others made him feel happier. He wasn’t missing out because he shared with his friends, he gained much more by sharing.

    Discuss the importance of sharing with others and how sharing makes both the giver and receiver feel.

    Further discussion: How does sharing help friends feel they belong?

Teacher notes:

This is a story about a fish that learns the value of sharing and friendship.

As an alternative to this media item, teachers may wish to source their own copy of The Rainbow Fish and read it directly to their class prior to the suggested activities.

 

Suggested activities:

Discuss the following:

  • How would you feel if you were the Rainbow Fish?
  • What if you were the Rainbow Fish’s friends?
  • How might you feel if the Rainbow Fish didn’t want to share his scales with you?
  • Has there been a time when you didn’t feel like sharing?
  • What might we be able to do when we don’t want to share what we are playing with?
  • What did the Rainbow Fish do? One thing he did was ask for help.
  • Discuss how sometimes it is really hard to share, especially when it is something that is important to us. Remind students that it is ok not to share something that is valuable and special and is something just for us. Brainstorm what students can do when they should share something, but they don’t want to.

 

Additional activities:

Complete art activity using the Rainbow Fish. Colouring sheet can be found at Coloring Home. In the scales, or under the shiny scales, students can show or write how sharing with others makes people feel. Provide each student with a foil sheet to create two shiny scales. One scale is to keep, the other is to share with a classmate that hasn’t been given a scale already.

Dax and the Ball

Type: Slides.

Duration: 6 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Dax has found himself in a situation where he wants something that someone else has. Throughout the story Dax identifies what he wants and how he can get it. He considers different options and the consequences of each action, but the choice is left to the reader as to which is the best way to act.

Teacher notes:

Revisit the Think step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model

  • When students apply the think section of the model, they are thinking about what they want, how others might be feeling and what others might be wanting. What do I want? How will others feel about that? What might other people want?
  • When students re-apply the think section, they are assessing how other people felt about the decision they made. How did it affect other people? What were they feeling and how do I know? Students will also reassess their own needs and if so, continue with the feel-think-act model.

Think - before doing or saying anything in a situation it is important to think about yourself and about others. You should think about:

  • exactly what it is you want.
  • how other people are feeling and what they might want.
  • the choices you could make.

This is important in helping you decided how to act.

 

Suggested activities:

Note: Suggestions are made with the intent that teachers will choose the content and activities that best fits their students’ needs.

Lesson 1

WALA (we are learning about): expressing needs, wants and feelings respectfully.

Inquiry question: How do I communicate with others respectfully?

  • Read through story Dax and the Ball with students (whole class, groups or individually depending on student needs/resources). Take the opportunity to highlight/identify emotions vocabulary and check for comprehension. For example: screen 3 – do students understand what it means when Dax is turning pink?
  • Provide opportunities for students to retell what was happening in the story.
  • Refer to the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model and ask students to identify whether Dax was using the model and how they know. Dax is using the Think step of the model and thinking about what he wants, how he could get what he wants and how Chris might feel.
  • Revisit the Think step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model. What do you think this step involves? Why do you think it is important to learn how to think first sometimes before we act? What questions could you ask yourselves?
  • Have students identify what they think it was that Dax wanted and the different choices he thought about making. Ask students if there are any other options that Dax could choose. Options could include: asking for the ball, push and hit Chris until he gives him the ball, let Chris know you’d like the ball next, yell and cry until you get the ball, give Chris something else to play with and take the ball, ask a teacher for another ball etc.
  • Explain to students that Dax hasn’t acted yet and there is time for them to help him make a positive choice. Divide the class into groups and assign each group one of Dax’s possible choices. Each group is to act out the choice they were given and a possible consequence of that choice. As each group performs, ask students to indicate with thumbs up/thumbs down/sideways whether they thought the choice was positive and respectful or not a great choice. Record choices that students indicated where positive.
  • Some acts can be followed with questions that extend students’ thinking. For example: What if Chris says he’s not allowed to share the ball because it belongs to someone else? What if Chris says he doesn’t want to play with Dax? What if Chris just says ‘no’? What if Dax steals the ball and Chris doesn’t care – does that make it ok? What will happen if you yell and cry every time you want something?

 

Additional activities:

Students could write the ending to the story. How does Dax choose to act and what are the consequences?

Using Feel, Think, Act, Reflect - Years F-2

Type: Slides.

Duration: 3 minutes.

Source: The Good Society.

Summary: Students apply the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model to scenarios that focus on a particular skill related to interacting with others respectfully that has been unpacked in previous lessons.

Teacher notes:

Students should be given opportunities to put their knowledge and skills around decision making and problem solving into practise. Scenarios will allow a safe environment for students to explore options and manage potential conflict before the situation occurs.

Intervention needs to occur if students are displaying aggressive, rough or inappropriate behaviour.

Selecting scenarios based on conflict that students may be experiencing in the classroom or playground will allow students to problem solve and build confidence for when they are in that situation at a later date.

The mistakes made in role playing have no real-life consequence and they provide opportunities for students to test ideas from different perspectives. They can be used to help students understand others and the positions of others. For example, students can role play a situation they have experienced conflict in but participate as another person in the situation.

In addition to this, skills or steps can be broken down during role play unlike during real experiences. Students can practise part of a particular skill or step in the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model before progressing to the next part or step.

The Feel, Think, Act, Reflect steps could be thought through in roleplay groups or as a whole class depending on student needs.

Slide 1: Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model

We’ve looked at the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model and how you can use it to make respectful choices.

  • Feel: What am I feeling? How do I know?
  • Think: What do I think I want? How might others feel and why? What do I think others want? What choices do I have to get what I want respectfully?
  • Act: Make a choice and act on it.
  • Reflect: How do I think everyone is feeling and what might they be thinking after my actions?

Slide 2: Story stills

We will also use our knowledge and skills to help Nova or Dax make more respectful choices along the way.

Slide 3: What would you do?

Now it’s your turn. Practice how you would use the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model in some situations. Let’s do some role play!

NOTE: Scenarios are at the teacher’s discretion but can follow the broad subjects on the slide (more specific scenarios are listed below).

Suggested activities:

Set up scenarios/role plays within the classroom in situations where students may experience conflict. Students practise using the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect model and ways of expressing their needs, wants and feelings in these situations. Scenarios could include any specific situations causing conflict within the classroom, playground or school or the following examples:

  • You've just started at a new school or have been put in a new class and you haven’t made any friends. There are lots of other students playing with each other and you’d like to join in.
  • You are happily playing with your friends and their beanie boos. A couple of students keep taking your toys and running away with them. They aren’t hurting your toys but they are stopping you and your friends from playing.
  • One of the teachers asks for some strong boys to help them with a job. You’re a girl and really want to help.
  • A group of students are playing a game. Each time one particular student gets tagged they won’t take it and argue that they aren’t in. The rest of the group don’t like this and want to play without the other student.
  • A few girls are dancing and a male student wants to join in. The girls tell him he can’t be a dancer and has to be in the audience. The male student thinks it’s just because he is a boy but he wants to let the girls know he should be able to dance too.
  • Someone in your class keeps taking your pencils.
  • It's dress up time in your class. Everyone wants the horse costume but the same students get it every time you have dress up play, and they are always boys.
  • Someone sat in your spot on the floor when you were about to listen to a story.
  • The same people keep getting picked for heads down, thumbs up and you NEVER get picked.
  • You’ve decided to play a game where everyone works at a hospital. One of the girls wants to be a doctor but one of the boys says that she has to be a nurse and only boys can be doctors.

Additional activities:

Students write their own scenarios demonstrating the Feel, Think, Act, Reflect process.